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Author Bardzell, Jeffrey.
Title Humanistic HCI / Jeffrey Bardzell and Shaowen Bardzell.
Alternative Title Humanistic human-computer interaction.
Publication Info San Rafael, California (1537 Fourth Street, San Rafael, CA 94901 USA) : Morgan & Claypool, 2015.



Descript 1 PDF (xxi, 163 pages) : illustrations.
Note Part of: Synthesis digital library of engineering and computer science.
Contents 1. Introduction -- 1.1 HCI and the humanities -- 1.2 Aims and structure of this book -- 1.3 Counteracting the God-trick: introducing your narrators --
Part I. Theorizing humanistic HCI -- 2. What is humanistic HCI? -- 2.1 What are the humanities? -- 2.1.1 The societal contribution of the humanities -- 2.1.2 Characteristic features of humanistic practice -- 2.1.3 Against the humanities -- 2.1.4 Final thoughts on the humanities -- 2.2 What is humanistic HCI? --
3. Humanistic HCI and methods -- 3.1 Methods and the subjects and objects of inquiry -- 3.2 Humanistic HCI methodologies: a survey -- 3.2.1 Importing a humanistic concept into HCI -- 3.2.2 Critical analysis of designs as theory-building -- 3.2.3 Critical analysis of HCI discourse -- 3.2.4 Blended critical and social scientific methodologies -- 3.2.5 Humanistic thinking and design futuring -- 3.3 Summary: three key themes of humanistic approaches -- 3.3.1 Critique: rooting out the stale and illuminating worth -- 3.3.2 Extending knowledge vs. improving thinking -- 3.3.3 Disclosing new forms of life --
4. Enacting the struggle for truth in full view: writing and reviewing humanistic research -- 4.1 The humanistic essay -- 4.2 The essay in HCI -- 4.3 Humanistic HCI and peer review -- 4.4 Humanistic HCI and interdisciplinary practice --
Part II. Major topics in humanistic HCI -- 5. User experience and aesthetics -- 5.1 From usability to user experience -- 5.2 The re-theorization of experience -- 5.3 Pragmatism and user experience -- 5.3.1 Dewey's theory of aesthetic experience -- 5.3.2 Deweyan pragmatism and UX -- 5.3.3 Somaesthetics or embodied pragmatism -- 5.4 Interaction design poetics -- 5.4.1 The poetics of Aristotle -- 5.4.2 Brenda Laurel: computers as theater -- 5.4.3 Reading Laurel, and Aristotle, today -- 5.5 Conclusion: a critical take on user experience concept systems --
6. Social change and emancipation -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Emancipatory critique in the humanities -- 6.2.1 Marxism, psychoanalysis, feminism, and postcolonialism -- 6.2.2 The hermeneutics of suspicion -- 6.3 Emancipation in HCI -- 6.4 Humanistic emancipatory HCI -- 6.4.1 Reflective HCI -- 6.4.2 Political (Marxist?) HCI -- 6.4.3 Feminism, queer theory, and/in HCI -- 6.4.4 Sex and the subject (psychoanalytic HCI?) -- 6.4.5 Postcolonial HCI -- 6.5 Conclusion: a critical take on emancipatory HCI --
7. Conclusion -- Bibliography -- About the authors.
Note Abstract freely available; full-text restricted to subscribers or individual document purchasers.
Although it has influenced the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) since its origins, humanistic HCI has come into its own since the early 2000s. In that time, it has made substantial contributions to HCI theory and methodologies and also had major influence in user experience (UX) design, aesthetic interaction, and emancipatory/social change-oriented approaches to HCI. This book reintroduces the humanities to a general HCI readership; characterizes its major epistemological and methodological commitments as well as forms of rigor; compares the scientific report vs. the humanistic essay as research products, while offering some practical advice for peer review; and focuses on two major topics where humanistic HCI has had particular influence in the field--user experience and aesthetics and emancipatory approaches to computing. This book argues for a more inclusive and broad reach for humanistic thought within the interdisciplinary field of HCI, and its lively and engaging style will invite readers into that project.
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader.
ISBN 9781627053587 ebook
9781627053570 print
Standard # 10.2200/S00664ED1V01Y201508HCI031 doi
Click on the terms below to find similar items in the catalogue
Author Bardzell, Jeffrey.
Series Synthesis lectures on human-centered informatics, # 31
Synthesis digital library of engineering and computer science.
Synthesis lectures on human-centered informatics ; # 31. 1946-7699
Subject Human-computer interaction.
Alt author Bardzell, Shaowen.
Alternative Title Humanistic human-computer interaction.
Descript 1 PDF (xxi, 163 pages) : illustrations.
Note Part of: Synthesis digital library of engineering and computer science.
Contents 1. Introduction -- 1.1 HCI and the humanities -- 1.2 Aims and structure of this book -- 1.3 Counteracting the God-trick: introducing your narrators --
Part I. Theorizing humanistic HCI -- 2. What is humanistic HCI? -- 2.1 What are the humanities? -- 2.1.1 The societal contribution of the humanities -- 2.1.2 Characteristic features of humanistic practice -- 2.1.3 Against the humanities -- 2.1.4 Final thoughts on the humanities -- 2.2 What is humanistic HCI? --
3. Humanistic HCI and methods -- 3.1 Methods and the subjects and objects of inquiry -- 3.2 Humanistic HCI methodologies: a survey -- 3.2.1 Importing a humanistic concept into HCI -- 3.2.2 Critical analysis of designs as theory-building -- 3.2.3 Critical analysis of HCI discourse -- 3.2.4 Blended critical and social scientific methodologies -- 3.2.5 Humanistic thinking and design futuring -- 3.3 Summary: three key themes of humanistic approaches -- 3.3.1 Critique: rooting out the stale and illuminating worth -- 3.3.2 Extending knowledge vs. improving thinking -- 3.3.3 Disclosing new forms of life --
4. Enacting the struggle for truth in full view: writing and reviewing humanistic research -- 4.1 The humanistic essay -- 4.2 The essay in HCI -- 4.3 Humanistic HCI and peer review -- 4.4 Humanistic HCI and interdisciplinary practice --
Part II. Major topics in humanistic HCI -- 5. User experience and aesthetics -- 5.1 From usability to user experience -- 5.2 The re-theorization of experience -- 5.3 Pragmatism and user experience -- 5.3.1 Dewey's theory of aesthetic experience -- 5.3.2 Deweyan pragmatism and UX -- 5.3.3 Somaesthetics or embodied pragmatism -- 5.4 Interaction design poetics -- 5.4.1 The poetics of Aristotle -- 5.4.2 Brenda Laurel: computers as theater -- 5.4.3 Reading Laurel, and Aristotle, today -- 5.5 Conclusion: a critical take on user experience concept systems --
6. Social change and emancipation -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Emancipatory critique in the humanities -- 6.2.1 Marxism, psychoanalysis, feminism, and postcolonialism -- 6.2.2 The hermeneutics of suspicion -- 6.3 Emancipation in HCI -- 6.4 Humanistic emancipatory HCI -- 6.4.1 Reflective HCI -- 6.4.2 Political (Marxist?) HCI -- 6.4.3 Feminism, queer theory, and/in HCI -- 6.4.4 Sex and the subject (psychoanalytic HCI?) -- 6.4.5 Postcolonial HCI -- 6.5 Conclusion: a critical take on emancipatory HCI --
7. Conclusion -- Bibliography -- About the authors.
Note Abstract freely available; full-text restricted to subscribers or individual document purchasers.
Although it has influenced the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) since its origins, humanistic HCI has come into its own since the early 2000s. In that time, it has made substantial contributions to HCI theory and methodologies and also had major influence in user experience (UX) design, aesthetic interaction, and emancipatory/social change-oriented approaches to HCI. This book reintroduces the humanities to a general HCI readership; characterizes its major epistemological and methodological commitments as well as forms of rigor; compares the scientific report vs. the humanistic essay as research products, while offering some practical advice for peer review; and focuses on two major topics where humanistic HCI has had particular influence in the field--user experience and aesthetics and emancipatory approaches to computing. This book argues for a more inclusive and broad reach for humanistic thought within the interdisciplinary field of HCI, and its lively and engaging style will invite readers into that project.
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader.
ISBN 9781627053587 ebook
9781627053570 print
Standard # 10.2200/S00664ED1V01Y201508HCI031 doi
Author Bardzell, Jeffrey.
Series Synthesis lectures on human-centered informatics, # 31
Synthesis digital library of engineering and computer science.
Synthesis lectures on human-centered informatics ; # 31. 1946-7699
Subject Human-computer interaction.
Alt author Bardzell, Shaowen.
Alternative Title Humanistic human-computer interaction.

Subject Human-computer interaction.
Descript 1 PDF (xxi, 163 pages) : illustrations.
Note Part of: Synthesis digital library of engineering and computer science.
Contents 1. Introduction -- 1.1 HCI and the humanities -- 1.2 Aims and structure of this book -- 1.3 Counteracting the God-trick: introducing your narrators --
Part I. Theorizing humanistic HCI -- 2. What is humanistic HCI? -- 2.1 What are the humanities? -- 2.1.1 The societal contribution of the humanities -- 2.1.2 Characteristic features of humanistic practice -- 2.1.3 Against the humanities -- 2.1.4 Final thoughts on the humanities -- 2.2 What is humanistic HCI? --
3. Humanistic HCI and methods -- 3.1 Methods and the subjects and objects of inquiry -- 3.2 Humanistic HCI methodologies: a survey -- 3.2.1 Importing a humanistic concept into HCI -- 3.2.2 Critical analysis of designs as theory-building -- 3.2.3 Critical analysis of HCI discourse -- 3.2.4 Blended critical and social scientific methodologies -- 3.2.5 Humanistic thinking and design futuring -- 3.3 Summary: three key themes of humanistic approaches -- 3.3.1 Critique: rooting out the stale and illuminating worth -- 3.3.2 Extending knowledge vs. improving thinking -- 3.3.3 Disclosing new forms of life --
4. Enacting the struggle for truth in full view: writing and reviewing humanistic research -- 4.1 The humanistic essay -- 4.2 The essay in HCI -- 4.3 Humanistic HCI and peer review -- 4.4 Humanistic HCI and interdisciplinary practice --
Part II. Major topics in humanistic HCI -- 5. User experience and aesthetics -- 5.1 From usability to user experience -- 5.2 The re-theorization of experience -- 5.3 Pragmatism and user experience -- 5.3.1 Dewey's theory of aesthetic experience -- 5.3.2 Deweyan pragmatism and UX -- 5.3.3 Somaesthetics or embodied pragmatism -- 5.4 Interaction design poetics -- 5.4.1 The poetics of Aristotle -- 5.4.2 Brenda Laurel: computers as theater -- 5.4.3 Reading Laurel, and Aristotle, today -- 5.5 Conclusion: a critical take on user experience concept systems --
6. Social change and emancipation -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Emancipatory critique in the humanities -- 6.2.1 Marxism, psychoanalysis, feminism, and postcolonialism -- 6.2.2 The hermeneutics of suspicion -- 6.3 Emancipation in HCI -- 6.4 Humanistic emancipatory HCI -- 6.4.1 Reflective HCI -- 6.4.2 Political (Marxist?) HCI -- 6.4.3 Feminism, queer theory, and/in HCI -- 6.4.4 Sex and the subject (psychoanalytic HCI?) -- 6.4.5 Postcolonial HCI -- 6.5 Conclusion: a critical take on emancipatory HCI --
7. Conclusion -- Bibliography -- About the authors.
Note Abstract freely available; full-text restricted to subscribers or individual document purchasers.
Although it has influenced the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) since its origins, humanistic HCI has come into its own since the early 2000s. In that time, it has made substantial contributions to HCI theory and methodologies and also had major influence in user experience (UX) design, aesthetic interaction, and emancipatory/social change-oriented approaches to HCI. This book reintroduces the humanities to a general HCI readership; characterizes its major epistemological and methodological commitments as well as forms of rigor; compares the scientific report vs. the humanistic essay as research products, while offering some practical advice for peer review; and focuses on two major topics where humanistic HCI has had particular influence in the field--user experience and aesthetics and emancipatory approaches to computing. This book argues for a more inclusive and broad reach for humanistic thought within the interdisciplinary field of HCI, and its lively and engaging style will invite readers into that project.
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader.
Alt author Bardzell, Shaowen.
ISBN 9781627053587 ebook
9781627053570 print
Standard # 10.2200/S00664ED1V01Y201508HCI031 doi

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