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Author English, Neil.
Title Choosing and Using a Refracting Telescope [electronic resource] / by Neil English.
Publication Info New York, NY : Springer New York : Imprint: Springer, 2011.



Descript XII, 284p. 139 illus., 20 illus. in colour. online resource.
text file PDF rda
Contents Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- About the Author -- Part 1: The Achromatic Refractor -- Chapter 1: The Refracting Telescope - A Brief History -- Chapter 2: The Classical Achromatic -- Chapter 3: Rich-Field Achromats -- Chapter 4: Long Focus Achromats -- Chapter 5: Big Guns -- Chapter 6: Going Retro -- Part II: The Apochromatic Refractor -- Chapter 7: The APO Revolution -- Chapter 8: Doublet Apos -- Chapter 9: Sports Optics -- Chapter 10: Triplet Apos -- Chapter 11: Four Element Apos -- Chapter 12: Refractor Kit -- Chapter 13: Observing Platforms -- Chapter 14: Testing your Refractor -- Chapter 15: Photography with your Refractor -- Chapter 16: Looking Back, Looking Forward -- Appendix A: Refractor Design Through the Centuries -- Appendix B: Double Star Tests for Refractors of Various Apertures -- Appendix C: Useful Formulae -- Appendix D: Glossary -- Index. ỹ
Note The refracting telescope has a long and illustrious past. Here's what the author says about early telescopes and today's refractors: 'Four centuries ago, a hitherto obscure Italian scientist turned a home-made spyglass towards the heavens. The lenses he used were awful by modern standards, inaccurately figured and filled with the scars of their perilous journey from the furnace to the finishing workshop. Yet, despite these imperfections, they allowed him to see what no one had ever seen before - a universe far more complex and dynamic than anyone had dared imagine. But they also proved endlessly useful in the humdrum of human affairs. For the first time ever, you could spy on your neighbor from a distance, or monitor the approach of a war-mongering army, thus deciding the fate of nations. 'The refractor is without doubt the prince of telescopes. Compared with all other telescopic designs, the unobstructed view of the refractor enables it to capture the sharpest, highest contrast images and the widest usable field. No other telescope design can beat it on equal terms. From a practical point of view, refractors are the most comfortable and least troublesome telescope to observe with. They require little maintenance and cool down rapidly to allow you to observe in minutes rather than hours. Because a refractor has more back focus than almost any other form of telescope, it can accept the widest range of accessories, including filters, cameras, and binoviewers.' Explore in this book what makes refractors such a good choice for amateur astronomers and how to choose the right one for you. Also get some great tips on how to use your new refractor. Get started now, seeing for yourself the dazzling and complex universe first opened to human sight more just 400 years ago.
ISBN 9781441964038
Standard # 10.1007/978-1-4419-6403-8 doi
Click on the terms below to find similar items in the catalogue
Author English, Neil.
Series Patrick Moore's Practical Astronomy Series,
Patrick Moore's Practical Astronomy Series, 1431-9756
Subject Physics.
Astronomy.
Photography, artistic.
Alt author SpringerLink (Online service)
Descript XII, 284p. 139 illus., 20 illus. in colour. online resource.
text file PDF rda
Contents Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- About the Author -- Part 1: The Achromatic Refractor -- Chapter 1: The Refracting Telescope - A Brief History -- Chapter 2: The Classical Achromatic -- Chapter 3: Rich-Field Achromats -- Chapter 4: Long Focus Achromats -- Chapter 5: Big Guns -- Chapter 6: Going Retro -- Part II: The Apochromatic Refractor -- Chapter 7: The APO Revolution -- Chapter 8: Doublet Apos -- Chapter 9: Sports Optics -- Chapter 10: Triplet Apos -- Chapter 11: Four Element Apos -- Chapter 12: Refractor Kit -- Chapter 13: Observing Platforms -- Chapter 14: Testing your Refractor -- Chapter 15: Photography with your Refractor -- Chapter 16: Looking Back, Looking Forward -- Appendix A: Refractor Design Through the Centuries -- Appendix B: Double Star Tests for Refractors of Various Apertures -- Appendix C: Useful Formulae -- Appendix D: Glossary -- Index. ỹ
Note The refracting telescope has a long and illustrious past. Here's what the author says about early telescopes and today's refractors: 'Four centuries ago, a hitherto obscure Italian scientist turned a home-made spyglass towards the heavens. The lenses he used were awful by modern standards, inaccurately figured and filled with the scars of their perilous journey from the furnace to the finishing workshop. Yet, despite these imperfections, they allowed him to see what no one had ever seen before - a universe far more complex and dynamic than anyone had dared imagine. But they also proved endlessly useful in the humdrum of human affairs. For the first time ever, you could spy on your neighbor from a distance, or monitor the approach of a war-mongering army, thus deciding the fate of nations. 'The refractor is without doubt the prince of telescopes. Compared with all other telescopic designs, the unobstructed view of the refractor enables it to capture the sharpest, highest contrast images and the widest usable field. No other telescope design can beat it on equal terms. From a practical point of view, refractors are the most comfortable and least troublesome telescope to observe with. They require little maintenance and cool down rapidly to allow you to observe in minutes rather than hours. Because a refractor has more back focus than almost any other form of telescope, it can accept the widest range of accessories, including filters, cameras, and binoviewers.' Explore in this book what makes refractors such a good choice for amateur astronomers and how to choose the right one for you. Also get some great tips on how to use your new refractor. Get started now, seeing for yourself the dazzling and complex universe first opened to human sight more just 400 years ago.
ISBN 9781441964038
Standard # 10.1007/978-1-4419-6403-8 doi
Author English, Neil.
Series Patrick Moore's Practical Astronomy Series,
Patrick Moore's Practical Astronomy Series, 1431-9756
Subject Physics.
Astronomy.
Photography, artistic.
Alt author SpringerLink (Online service)

Subject Physics.
Astronomy.
Photography, artistic.
Descript XII, 284p. 139 illus., 20 illus. in colour. online resource.
text file PDF rda
Contents Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- About the Author -- Part 1: The Achromatic Refractor -- Chapter 1: The Refracting Telescope - A Brief History -- Chapter 2: The Classical Achromatic -- Chapter 3: Rich-Field Achromats -- Chapter 4: Long Focus Achromats -- Chapter 5: Big Guns -- Chapter 6: Going Retro -- Part II: The Apochromatic Refractor -- Chapter 7: The APO Revolution -- Chapter 8: Doublet Apos -- Chapter 9: Sports Optics -- Chapter 10: Triplet Apos -- Chapter 11: Four Element Apos -- Chapter 12: Refractor Kit -- Chapter 13: Observing Platforms -- Chapter 14: Testing your Refractor -- Chapter 15: Photography with your Refractor -- Chapter 16: Looking Back, Looking Forward -- Appendix A: Refractor Design Through the Centuries -- Appendix B: Double Star Tests for Refractors of Various Apertures -- Appendix C: Useful Formulae -- Appendix D: Glossary -- Index. ỹ
Note The refracting telescope has a long and illustrious past. Here's what the author says about early telescopes and today's refractors: 'Four centuries ago, a hitherto obscure Italian scientist turned a home-made spyglass towards the heavens. The lenses he used were awful by modern standards, inaccurately figured and filled with the scars of their perilous journey from the furnace to the finishing workshop. Yet, despite these imperfections, they allowed him to see what no one had ever seen before - a universe far more complex and dynamic than anyone had dared imagine. But they also proved endlessly useful in the humdrum of human affairs. For the first time ever, you could spy on your neighbor from a distance, or monitor the approach of a war-mongering army, thus deciding the fate of nations. 'The refractor is without doubt the prince of telescopes. Compared with all other telescopic designs, the unobstructed view of the refractor enables it to capture the sharpest, highest contrast images and the widest usable field. No other telescope design can beat it on equal terms. From a practical point of view, refractors are the most comfortable and least troublesome telescope to observe with. They require little maintenance and cool down rapidly to allow you to observe in minutes rather than hours. Because a refractor has more back focus than almost any other form of telescope, it can accept the widest range of accessories, including filters, cameras, and binoviewers.' Explore in this book what makes refractors such a good choice for amateur astronomers and how to choose the right one for you. Also get some great tips on how to use your new refractor. Get started now, seeing for yourself the dazzling and complex universe first opened to human sight more just 400 years ago.
Alt author SpringerLink (Online service)
ISBN 9781441964038
Standard # 10.1007/978-1-4419-6403-8 doi

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