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020    9781444346930 (e-book) 
020    9781444335675 (pbk.)  
020    9781444346930 (PDF e-book) 
020    9781444346961 (HTML e-book) 
020    9781444346947 (ePub e-book)   
020    9781444346954 (Mobipocket e-book) 
040    StDuBDS|cStDuBDS|dStDuBDSZ|dUkPrAHLS 
050  0 RC112|b.C626 2012 
082 04 616.9|223 
245 00 Communicable disease control and health protection 
       handbook /|cJeremy Hawker ... [et al.]. 
250    3rd ed. 
260    Chichester :|bWiley-Blackwell,|c2012. 
300    xiii, 440 p. :|bcol. ill. 
500    Previous ed.: published as Communicable disease control 
       handbook. Blackwell Science, 2005. 
505 0  Foreword. Abbreviations. Section 1: Introduction. 1.1 How 
       to use this book. 1.2 Basic Concepts in the Epidemiology 
       and Control of InfectiousDisease. 1.3 Health Protection on
       -call. Section 2: Common topics. 2.1 Meningitis and 
       meningism. 2.2 Gastrointestinal infection. 2.3 Community 
       acquired pneumonia. 2.4 Rash in pregnancy. 2.5 Rash and 
       fever in children. 2.6 Illness in returning travellers. 
       2.7 Sexually Transmitted Infections. 2.8 Jaundice. 2.9 
       Infection in the immunocompromised. 2.10 Blood borne viral
       infections. 2.11 Vaccine Queries. 2.12 Individual measures
       against infections. Section 3: Diseases. 3.1 Amoebic 
       dysentery. 3.2 Anthrax. 3.3 Bacillus cereus. 3.4 Botulism.
       3.5 Brucellosis. 3.6 Burkholderia. 3.7 Campylobacter. 3.8 
       Chickenpox and shingles (varicella-zoster infections). 3.9
       Chikungunya. 3.10 Chlamydophila pneumoniae. 3.11 
       Chlamydophila psittaci. 3.12 Chlamydia trachomatis 
       (genital). 3.13 Cholera. 3.14 CJD and other human 
       transmissible spongiformencephalopathies. 3.15 Clostridium
       difficile. 3.16 Clostridium perfringens. 3.17 
       Coxsackievirus infections. 3.18 Cryptosporidiosis. 3.19 
       Cyclosporiasis. 3.20 Cytomegalovirus. 3.21 Dengue fever. 
       3.22 Diphtheria. 3.23 Encephalitis, acute. 3.24 
       Enterococci, including glycopeptide-resistant 
       enterococci(GRE). 3.25 Epstein Barr virus. 3.26 
       Escherichia coli O157 (and other E. coligastroenteritis). 
       3.27 Giardiasis. 3.28 Gonorrhoea, syphilis and other acute
       STIs. 3.29 Hantavirus. 3.30 Head lice. 3.31 Helicobacter 
       pylori. 3.32 Hepatitis A. 3.33 Hepatitis B. 3.34 Hepatitis
       C. 3.35 Delta hepatitis. 3.36 Hepatitis E. 3.37 Herpes 
       simplex. 3.38 Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). 3.39 
       HIV. 3.40 Influenza. 3.41 Japanese B encephalitis. 3.42 
       Kawasaki Syndrome. 3.43 Legionellosis. 3.44 Leprosy. 3.45 
       Leptospirosis. 3.46 Listeria. 3.47 Lyme disease. 3.48 
       Malaria. 3.49 Measles. 3.50 Meningococcal infection. 3.51 
       Molluscum contagiosum. 3.52 MRSA (methicillin-resistant 
       Staphylococcus aureus). 3.53 Mumps. 3.54 Mycoplasma. 3.55 
       Norovirus. 3.56 Paratyphoid fever. 3.57 Parvovirus B19 
       (fifth disease). 3.58 Plague. 3.59 Pneumococcal infection.
       3.60 Poliomyelitis. 3.61 Q fever. 3.62 Rabies. 3.63 
       Relapsing Fever. 3.64 Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). 
       3.65 Ringworm. 3.66 Rotavirus. 3.67 Rubella. 3.68 
       Salmonellosis. 3.69 Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome 
       (SARS). 3.70 Scabies 3.71 Shigella. 3.72 Smallpox. 3.73 
       Staphylococcal food poisoning. 3.74 Streptococcal 
       infections. 3.75 Tetanus. 3.76 Threadworms. 3.77 Tick-
       borne encephalitis. 3.78 Toxocara. 3.79 Toxoplasmosis. 
       3.80 Tuberculosis. 3.81 Tularaemia. 3.82 Typhoid fever. 
       3.83 Rickettsial infections (incl. Typhus) Ehrlichia 
       andBartonella. 3.84 Vibrio parahaemolyticus. 3.85 Viral 
       haemorrhagic fevers. 3.86 Warts and verrucae. 3.87 West 
       Nile Virus. 3.88 Whooping cough. 3.89 Yellow fever. 3.90 
       Yersiniosis. 3.91 Other organisms. Section 4: Services and
       organisations. 4.1 Surveillance of communicable disease. 
       4.2 Managing infectious disease incidents and outbreaks. 
       4.3 Infection Prevention and Control in the Community. 4.4
       Healthcare Associated Infection. 4.5 Antimicrobial 
       Resistance. 4.6 Risks to and from Health Care Workers. 4.7
       Co-ordination of immunisation services. 4.8 Services for 
       sexual health and HIV infection. 4.9 Services for 
       tuberculosis control. 4.10 Travel Health. 4.11 Pandemic 
       Preparedness and the Influenza A H1N1 2009Pandemic. 4.12 
       Non-infectious environmental hazards. 4.13 Managing acute 
       chemical incidents. 4.14 Managing acute radiation 
       incidents. 4.15 Deliberate release of biological, chemical
       or radiologicalagents. 4.16 Media Relations and Crisis 
       Communication. 4.17 Clinical Governance and Audit. 4.18 
       Global health. Section 5: Communicable disease control in 
       Europe. 5.1 WHO and International Health Regulations 
       (IHR). 5.2 Collaboration within the European Union. 5.3 
       Detailed national example: organisational arrangements 
       forhealth protection: England, 2010. 5.4 Austria. 5.5 
       Belgium. 5.6 Bulgaria. 5.7 Cyprus. 5.8 Czech Republic. 5.9
       Denmark. 5.10 Estonia. 5.11 Finland. 5.12 France. 5.13 
       Germany. 5.14 Greece. 5.15 Hungary. 5.16 Iceland. 5.17 
       Ireland. 5.18 Italy. 5.19 Latvia. 5.20 Lithuania. 5.21 
       Luxembourg. 5.22 Malta. 5.23 The Netherlands. 5.24 Norway.
       5.25 Poland. 5.26 Portugal. 5.27 Romania. 5.28 Slovakia. 
       5.29 Slovenia. 5.30 Spain. 5.31 Sweden. 5.32 Switzerland. 
       5.33 United Kingdom. Appendix 1 Useful addresses and 
       telephone numbers. Appendix 2 Guidance documents and 
       books. Index. 
506 1  400 annual accesses.|5UkHlHU 
650  0 Communicable diseases. 
650  0 Communicable diseases|xPrevention. 
700 1  Hawker, Jeremy. 
740 0  Communicable disease control handbook. 
856 40 |uhttp://www.vlebooks.com/vleweb/product/
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